11 Interesting Facts, Figures And Statistics About Canada

The country of Canada is packed full of information that is both interesting and intriguing. For example, did you know that in the 2008 immigration statistics, 9,243 people from the UK were granted a permanent visa for Canada?

Did you also know that Canada is one of the best places in the world to see polar bears in their buy cialis doctor online natural habitat?

If you’re interested in Canada, or simply want to find out more about the country, these 11 points are all interesting facts, figures and statistics that should offer an insight into this fantastic country.

1. Canada is the second largest country on earth. Having 3,854,086 square miles of territory, it is over 2,500,000 square miles behind Russia, which covers an area of 6,592,800 square miles.

2. There are currently 42 National Parks and National Park Reserves in Canada, showcasing the most beautiful aspects of all of the country. Of the 36 National Parks, St Lawrence Island is the smallest at 3.4 square miles and Wood Buffalo is the largest, covering 17,300 square miles of land.

3. The country has two national sports – one for winter and one for summer. With ice hockey being the official sport for winter, it is the game of lacrosse, which is practically unknown in the UK, which is the chosen summer sport.

4. Canada is also involved heavily in a vast array of other sports, most notably basketball, baseball and Canadian football, Brand Viagra the latter being a game that although similar to American Football, is not often played outside of the country.

5. Whilst basketball is officially a Canadian game (it was invented by Professor James Naismith, a Canadian working in America, in 1891), they have only one team, the Toronto Blue Jays, competing at the highest level, which is in the National Basketball Association (NBA).

6. According to the last census in 2006, there are 31,241,030 people living in Canada, giving a population density of 8.3 people for every square mile.

7. Of these 31 million people, 21% cited their ethnic origin as being English, whilst 15.8% said they were French.

8. Information provided from the 2001 census showed that the vast majority of people claimed that their religion was Christianity, at 77.1% of the population. A further 16.5% said they followed no religion and the remaining 6.4% was made up largely of a mixture of Islam (2%), Judaism Levitra Professional (1.1%), Buddhism (1%), Hinduism (1%) and Sikhism (0.9%).

9. Canada has 8 recognisable symbols and although the most notable is the maple leaf, the 7 other national symbols are made up of 3 animals (beaver, Canadian Goose and Common Loon) as well as the Crown, Royal mounted police, totem pole and Inukshuk, a form of man-made stone monument.

10. The country is split into 13 different areas, made up of 10 provinces (Alberta, British Colombia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec and Saskatchewan) and 3 territories (Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Yukon).

11. The primary difference between a Canadian province and a territory is that whereas a province takes its authority from the Constitution Act of 1867, territories takes their powers from the federal government.

11. The highest point in the whole of the country is Mount Logan, which stands 19,551feet above sea level in the Kluane National Park and Reserve, Yukon.

Author Bio: Global Visas are a world leading authority on Canada immigration and Canada visas for private individuals and corporate clients, providing the most comprehensive and up-to-date Canada work visa and visa for Canada advice. Visit GlobalVisas.com for more information.

Category: Recreation and Leisure/Travel/Destinations
Keywords: visa for canada, canadian visa, move to canada, canadian work visa, canada, visa

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