Exploring What Makes The Perfect Canadian Citizen

In the UK, there’s no certain way to say what exactly makes the perfect citizen and in Canada it is no different.

Everyone’s views vary, often greatly, on what qualities the perfect citizen would have and therefore although an idea could be created by taking into consideration various different views, it would not be accurate due to the thoughts varying so much.

However, although we can’t look to create a specific set of qualities of what makes the perfect Canadian citizen, we can look at what Citizenship In Canada (CIC) award the highest points to for a skilled Canadian work visa, therefore giving a good idea of what the country is looking for in its immigrants.

To start with, the education part of the application asks for all applicants to provide their highest level of formal education. With no education over high school, applicants are awarded 5 points, which is the lowest amount and for either a Masters degree or PhD with over 17 years of being a full time student, they will receive 25 points.

Next up is the language proficiency points, which looks at the applicant’s ability to write, read, speak and listen either English or French (or both), depending on which the applicant states is their most proficient language.

For each of the four aspects – writing, reading, speaking and listening – an applicant can achieve up to 4 points for each, meaning that for one language, should the applicant achieve a high level in each area, they could receive 16 points.

1 to 2 points are awarded for a basic proficiency, with 2 points being given for a moderate proficiency and should the applicant state they are knowledgeable of two languages, they can achieve an additional 1 or 2 points, depending on the proficiency, for each of the 4 aspects of the second language.

Further to the language, a value is given to the amount of work experience that the applicant has in their employment, with the highest score being 21 points for 4 or more years experience and 15 points for only 1 year.

Age is the next part to look at, although if aged between 21 and 49, applicants will receive the maximum points possible, which is 10. Outside of this and they’ll be deducted 2 points for every year under 21 or over 49 and 0 points are awarded for those applicants aged 17 years an under or 53 years and over.

If the applicant has arranged their own employment in the country (and it has been approved by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada), the applicant will receive an extra 10 points on their application.

The final aspect is adaptability to living in Canada and applicants will be awarded up to 5 points if their partner has a good education, 5 points if a 2 year education has been carried out in Canada and 5 points if 12 months full time employment has been had in the Levitra country

Looking through the points system, it shows clearly just what Canada are looking for – a well educated, bi-lingual person between 21 and 49 years old that has over generic cialis review 4 years experience of working in their chosen profession and who as well as arranging their own employment, has family in Canada who can help ease them into Canadian life.

Sound like you? If it doesn’t, don’t worry too much about it – it’s very rare that someone fits this specification exactly and therefore as long as you rank well in most of the areas, it’s recommended that you apply for a Canadian work visa as soon as you’re sure you’re ready to emigrate.

Author Bio: Global Visas are a world leading authority on Canada immigration and Canada visas for private individuals and Tadacip corporate clients, providing the most comprehensive and up-to-date Canada work visa and visa for Canada advice. Visit GlobalVisas.com for more information.

Category: Recreation and Leisure/Travel/Destinations
Keywords: canadian work visa, canadian visa, work visa for canada, canada visa, work visa, visa

Related Articles:


Post Footer automatically generated by Add Post Footer Plugin for wordpress.

Website Pin Facebook Twitter Myspace Friendfeed Technorati del.icio.us Digg Google StumbleUpon Premium Responsive

Leave a Reply